Saturday, January 07, 2012

Fireman – Part 10

We finish up carving the left arm with this one.  He’s really starting to look good…at least I think so. 

10 comments:

  1. He looks great with that axe. it really suits him. The hose idea is also great, but sounds difficult to achieve with any type of wood material.I am confident you will figure it out, but I sure as heck don't have any idea as to what material would work. Another suggestion would be to make this fireman a Chief (by painting his helmet white or gold instead of red) and having him holding a brass speaking trumpet (like they showed recently on Antiques Roadshow) to shout out orders to the crew. I wasn't sure at the start of the project that a bust would convey the dynamic image of a fireman as well as a full figure, but you are changing my mind by the great composition of this carving....I really am liking this guy!!! Great work so far and thanks for sharing with us.

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  2. Cant wait to try this one... Looking great Lynn

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  3. Lynn, this is a stunning piece and will be beautiful when finished. I have a question. If someone were to ask you to add legs to this particular piece, could you or would you have to make a new body from the shoulders to the feet. Judy good video work. fred

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  4. When you were working on that arm, it seemed like like you you had so much more to do - then - BAM! - it came together. You are right, you nailed it Lynn.
    As for the hose, the outside of the hose is like canvas. The thing that popped into my mind was shoelaces or bootlaces - more specifically, the huge shoelaces that are found in the sneakers that the young people don't seem to tie nowadays. Maybe dye them to help stiffen them and maybe some kind of finish to soak in to stiffen them. My wife is always making jewelry and things. She oftentimes quickly burns the ends of thread using a lighter to keep them from fraying and makes the ends more workable. Just brainstorming. Hope this helps. Jim

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  5. Fred, great question and I have thought about doing that and just might try after I get the upper part finished just to see if it can be done. But don't tell the socalled professionals as they already give me grief about attaching arms.!

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  6. Jim: That's a great idea and I will no doubt immediately go to WalMart and check out the shoe lace display. It would also depend on the scale of the lace to the figure as to whether it would work.

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  7. Lynn...If you want to order some tupelo I have a source to share..check out your email for the name and phone number. If you want to go the material route you might check out para cord. It's it is larger in scale than shoelaces, but round so you'd have to find a way to flatten it, if you wanted an uncharged hose on the shoulder. You might use your newly found super glue to stiffen the cord and then paint to simulate canvas. Sharp looking fireman.

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  8. I'm sorry everyone, but, what is tupelo??? I've never heard of it.
    I did a search on Google and came up with the birthplace of Elvis!!! Seriously!!!
    Also, the thought occurred to me that artist canvas could be cut or folded over on itself for scale and can be stiffened with gesso or acrylic!!!
    Jim

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  9. Always carving, Tupelo actually comes from the Tupelo Gum tree. They grow in swamps and the usable wood comes from the trunk from the water line to about six feet up. Any higher and the wood is too hard to carve. The wood is really suited for power carving, stoning, and burning, and used by wildlife carvers. Cajun decoy carvers have used hatchets, draw knives, and knives with a pronounced upsweep which have to be super sharp. I have been told that some old Cajuns carved their decoys while the wood was green. It bends well when steamed and sands beautifully.

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  10. Thanks Gary!
    I ran across what it looked like on Rockler's website buthad no idea of where it came from or what it was used for. Jim

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