Friday, October 14, 2011

Muy Caliente – Part 18

A thin mustache, a few dots, and some stained pants! 

6 comments:

  1. I never would have used blue to shade a white pant...it is amazing what I am learning fr om your video's. Do you have formal training in painting? Your knowledge seems to me to be above that of the casual hobby painter. I regret to this day not taking lessons from my mother when I was little, she taught painting locally and eventually at a community college, but painting wasn't "manly" enough to intrest me in my teens. Now Alzheimer's has robbed her of the ability to either paint or remember how to paint so I can no longer learn from her. I remember seeing some painting in your tour of the Gallery that you painted, and they were excellent. I don't think I stood in the right line when the talent was handed out. What suggestions do you have to study to learn more about painting and color (transparency, blending and mixing, etc). Thanks for sharing your talent and knowledge with us thanks to Judy for the cinematography.

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  2. Kent, I know how you feel - Lynn is good. For my two cents - I teach photography. I advise my students to take fundamental art classes to help understand light, color and composition. However, I warn that if they begin the study of art, they can quickly be sucked into the study and head into directions far off from their original intent. Read of a good book, watch a good video or two and then just trial and error at what you are doing works best for me. Notice Lynn mixes colors but does not get it "right" the first time. He adjusts by mixing until he gets what he wants which is his preference. No offense to you Lynn but, just as an example of the differences between two people with netiher being right or wrong, I probably would not have used straight white to begin with. I would have mixed in a tiny bit of yellow ochre first to get a very slightly off white color first. But, this is my preference. I like Lynn's approach not using black for the shadows. Lynn explains burning the wood to keep the paint from spreading, but, it also creates the deep shadows in the spectrum of highlights, midtones and shadows which makes creating shadows easier I think. Anyway, my two cents...:) And for a third cent... i do not mind if you speak in the video Judy. When you said that the black on black doesn't show, I was thinking the same thing. :) Jim

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  3. These videos and the narrative really are great. I know it will help improve my carvings. I wonder if Lynn will have any hair for the Dayton Show? Keep pullin' Judy! LOL

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  4. I have one question,Lynn, what would you use for dark colors like blue or black, for shading. Thanks so much to both of you for this wonderful video. fred k

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  5. As black is the absence of color the only way you can shade it is to add color. Say I was painting a black horse....I would lightly dry brush a very white tan over those areas with deep valleys being careful not to change the overall black appearance. For Blue you can add any darker color for shading. Just a touch of black, dark purple, even brown. It all depends on what type of effect you're trying to achieve.

    There really are no set rules on mixing colors. The best guide is to look at how others handle such situations. That's why I love to go to museums or galleries to do that very thing. Hope that helps.

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  6. Thank you Lynn, it helped a great deal. fred k

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